Touch-type, Read and Spell with confidence

An award-winning, multi-sensory course that
teaches typing, reading and spelling

Learn more Request Demo

Features

How does TTRS work?

Modular design

Bite-size learning

TTRS is modular in design and contains 24 levels with 31 modules in each level. A module typically takes a few minutes to complete and we recommend taking 2-3 modules a session. Student success is encouraged by immediate feedback and positive reinforcement. This feedback includes a score that is based on completion rates and accuracy, not speed or time taken.

TTRS teaches typing and spelling in 24 levels which are broken down into 31 modules. A module typically takes a few minutes to complete and we recommend taking 2-3 modules a session. Scores are based on completion rates and accuracy, not speed.

First score – first success

Basic phonics

The course starts with learning to touch-type, read and spell the vowels – a , e , i , o , u. The audio track accompanies the letters as they appear on screen, reinforcing sound-letter correspondence, which is a crucial skill for sounding out words in reading. The user then receives their first score – and success!

Learners begin by typing the vowels - a, e, i, o, u. The audio track accompanies letters and words as they are shown on screen. The user receives their first score – and success!

Phonics and repetition

Whole-word repetition

In the second level, the student is introduced to words grouped by onset, vowel-blend and final consonant. For example – fed, wed, led. This teaches phonics in context and at the same time the student learns the position of the keys using the on-screen hand guides.

With repetition, words move from short-term to long-term memory and the skill of typing begins to feel more comfortable. Repetition is also a way of over-learning that can help users with dyslexia overcome working memory and processing difficulties.

Words are grouped by onset, vowel-blend and final consonant. For example – fed, wed, led. At the same time learners master the position of the keys using the on-screen hand guides.

Multi-sensory approach

TTRS takes a multi-sensory approach to repetition learning. Through the multi-sensory approach, a user hears the words spoken through headphones or speakers, sees the words printed on the screen, and is prompted as to which fingers to press via the on-screen keyboard.

Finally, through the sense of touch, they type out the words, harnessing muscle memory in the hands and fingers to learn spelling.

Learners hear the words spoken, see the words on screen and are prompted as to which keys to press. Through the sense of touch, they harness muscle-memory in the fingers and learn to spell.

 

Meet more TTRS users

Read and Spell Blog

Communicating with stroke patients

Communicating with stroke patients

It takes us a lifetime to master communication skills in our mother tongue but our ability to communicate can be erased in an instant when a stroke occurs. That’s because a stroke cuts off blood supply to the brain, causing brain cells to be deprived of oxygen. Depending on the location and severity of a stroke, motor, memory and language skills can be impacted.

How long does it take to learn to touch type?

How long does it take to learn to touch type?

Have you ever met an individual who can type on a keyboard without looking down at his or her fingers?

Perhaps it is a fellow student participating in a group discussion and typing up notes at the same time, or a co-worker sending out emails as you dictate the text. It might even be a friend creating an electronic to-do list to keep your afternoon on track.

There is something impressive about the way touch-typing carries on at such a steady and even pace, allowing the typist to automatize their movements and focus on the words on the screen. It’s almost as though the keyboard becomes an extension of their fingers.

How to build a homeschool reading program

How to build a homeschool reading program

Teaching reading is one of the first big challenges homeschool parents of younger children face. That’s because there’s a lot riding on successful literacy skills development. Learning to read is not only fundamental for the language arts part of your curriculum but necessary for most other subjects you teach.

Learn more about how reading works (and what phonics and spelling have to do with it), to help you choose the right pre-K to grade 5 reading resources and prepare your child for any bumps on the road to becoming a strong reader.